yourYukon Archive

This is an archive of newspaper columns on Yukon science, many of which were written by Claire. The column appeared in the Yukon News each Friday, running from 1996 to 2006, sponsored by Environment Canada (Series 1). Funding ran out in 2006, but the column was revived in 2009 with new sponsors, including the Yukon Government and the Yukon Research Centre (Series 2). Over the years, columns from Series 1 and 2 were archived on taiga.net, a cooperative website based in the Yukon. The columns proved popular around the world, many receiving hundreds to thousands of hits (and contributing to lots of school projects). The archive of Series 1 was removed from taiga.net when the website was moved to its new location. It seemed a shame to lose those 466 columns—so here they are… (In progress—we are creating and adding pdf’s as time permits, starting with Column 1 at the bottom of this long list.)

Acknowledgements. Cody Miller: web design and taiga.net maintenance; people at Environment Canada (Pacific and Yukon Region) and the Yukon News: vision and years of support.

Quick jump to: 1996 – 1997199819992000200120022003200420052006

2006 columns

  • Column 466: Barrier to salmon crumbles on the Alsek
  • Column 465: Avalanche forecasting has traditional roots
  • Column 464: Drought stress changing the Takhini landscape
  • Column 463: Snowshoe hares might have something to teach us about stress
  • Column 462: Different places produce different dialects – in birds too
  • Column 461: Ancient beaver dam records beaver building techniques
  • Column 460: Coyote calling cards contain valuable DNA evidence
  • Column 459: Canada’s rarest plant rediscovered in Kluane region
  • Column 458: Trap-happy marten still not easy to study
  • Column 457: Field guides redirect our gaze toward our smaller neighbours
  • Column 456: Caribou research goes international
  • Column 455: Caribou biologist Russell retires, but not from science
  • Column 454: Catching the drift

2005 columns

  • Column 453: The 10th Anniversary yourYukon Christmas Quiz
  • Column 452: B.C. goshawk advocate acquired valuable tools in the Yukon
  • Column 451: A red squirrel’s nest is key to winter survival
  • Column 450: Specialized woodpeckers pig out on beetle buffet
  • Column 449: Specialists cope with a blessing’s curse
  • Column 448: Canada’s boreal: a landscape of opportunity
  • Column 447: Researchers finally pay attention to a misunderstood blackbird
  • Column 446: It’s a mast, mast year for white spruce
  • Column 445: Unsung Bering cisco deserve more respect
  • Column 444: Good data means better protection for vulnerable shorebirds
  • Column 443: Seasonal forecasts getting better all the time
  • Column 442: Salmon in the trees
  • Column 441: Science institute celebrates birthday with ‘violence’ and cake
  • Column 440: YSI celebrates 20th anniversary with ‘lights show’
  • Column 439: Changing treelines in a warmer world
  • Column 438: Birch not defenceless in the boreal forest
  • Column 437: YCS makes friends with woodland walks
  • Column 436: Slow and steady motion draws power from the wind
  • Column 435: Noxious weeds beguile nature lovers
  • Column 434: Local interest in solar astronomy is heating up
  • Column 433: Light storms rage above the sky
  • Column 432: Science and art support and inform one another
  • Column 431: Slimy sculpin stick close to home
  • Column 430: Peregrines return to the marge of Laberge
  • Column 429: Ice patch artifacts show links with White River ash
  • Column 427: Carmacks’ community green thumb
  • Column 426: Living with bears
  • Column 425: Interpreting the Tombstones
  • Column 424: Hard work leads to national science fair
  • Column 423: Shroom boom coming soon
  • Column 422: Departing paleontologist reflects on recent past
  • Column 421: Community stewards spur action on conservation
  • Column 420: Tracking counts
  • Column 419: Little ground squirrels help answer big questions
  • Column 418: Lake Laberge fish still puzzle scientists
  • Column 417: International wildlife group comes to the Yukon
  • Column 416: Bison horror story has a happy ending here
  • Column 415: Climate change a factor in environmental assessment
  • Column 414: Ravens hit town in winter
  • Column 413: Sea change underway in Pacific
  • Column 412: Flying Kyoto-friendly skies
  • Column 411: Birds tough it out through the Yukon winter
  • Column 410: Eskers are ribbons of life in the boreal
  • Column 409: Let it snow, snow, snow
  • Column 408: Shallow ponds are prime duck real estate
  • Column 407: Snow lovers
  • Column 406: Hot bird sightings on cold Christmas bird counts

2004 columns

  • Column 405: Annual yourYukon Christmas Quiz strikes again!
  • Column 404: Troubled waters for Kluane kokanee
  • Column 403: The ferocious predators of Beringia
  • Column 402: Good CARMA for reindeer and caribou
  • Column 401: Hunting slugs on the tundra
  • Column 400: Put an end to excessive idling
  • Column 399: Yukon’s ecoregions get their own book
  • Column 398: Slip-sliding away in the southern Yukon
  • Column 397: Sometimes trees just can’t take the blow
  • Column 396: Westerly winds can wreak havoc
  • Column 395: International Polar Year puts spotlight on North
  • Column 394: Whitehorse goes on a diet
  • Column 393: Yukon elk on the upswing
  • Column 392: Capturing the hidden beauty of ice fog
  • Column 391: Boreal researcher heads north to reflect
  • Column 390: Ancient glaciers determine salmon range
  • Column 389: Mountain lions on the move
  • Column 388: New traffic lights are a long-term bargain
  • Column 387: It’s feeling hot, hot, hot
  • Column 386: Dempster Highway: a road to research
  • Column 385: Errant wildlife in the icefields
  • Column 384: Researchers to study aftermath of wildfire summer
  • Column 383: Yukon River peregrines still have their ups and downs
  • Column 382: Fire a boost to moose
  • Column 381: Yukon wildfire season hottest in Canada
  • Column 380: Farming the frontier
  • Column 379: Extreme birder nets 103 species
  • Column 378: Studying the water beneath your feet
  • Column 377: Veteran weather watcher receives accolades
  • Column 376: Caribou fences highlight Gwich’in world view
  • Column 375: Northern Canada breaks new ground in wildlife management
  • Column 374: Twilight of the Whitehorse pigeon
  • Column 373: Aspen clones take the size prize
  • Column 372: PlantWatch blossoms in the Yukon
  • Column 371: Reclusive swallow bugs enter the spotlight
  • Column 370: Northern knowledge helps lead the way
  • Column 369: New roads booklet shows problems and solutions
  • Column 368: Snow buntings roll through the Yukon
  • Column 367: Where are the snows of yesteryear?
  • Column 366: Coyotes make prickly choices when bunnies not around
  • Column 365: Kluane home to underground treasure
  • Column 364: Drilling through ice on the Red Planet
  • Column 363: Mountain goats are rarest of the rare
  • Column 362: Measure your ‘greenness’ with an energy & waste audit
  • Column 361: Volunteers give a hoot for owl research
  • Column 360: Traditional light bulb may go the way of the dodo
  • Column 359: Looking for marten? Ask a trapper
  • Column 358: Bountiful Beringian flora
  • Column 357: Domestic reindeer opt for a wild life
  • Column 356: Many different routes to a science fair prize

2003 columns

  • Column 355: The Annual World Famous yourYukon Christmas Quiz!
  • Column 354: The Yukon lands a Cannings
  • Column 353: Building on a legacy of research at Kluane
  • Column 352: Ibex Caribou need a little more peace and quiet
  • Column 351: Researchers unlock the secrets of past climates
  • Column 350: Mount Logan ice cores tell a tale of the past
  • Column 349: Future forests could favour aspen
  • Column 348: Sharing knowledge, sharing fish
  • Column 347: Game guardians
  • Column 346: Red squirrels show evolution in the making
  • Column 345: Urban architecture
  • Column 344: Calling all computers
  • Column 343: Managing grizzlies not just about biology
  • Column 342: A visit to Bennett’s Botanical Basement
  • Column 341: Counting on the ground has its benefits
  • Column 340: Kluane beetle history all in the rings
  • Column 339: The bug-eyed life of an Environment Canada intern
  • Column 338: Trees plus temperature change is not a simple equation
  • Column 337: Plants find creative ways to travel
  • Column 336: Yukon insects outsmart northern climate
  • Column 335: Researchers look at life on the Arctic edge
  • Column 334: Bluethroats breeding in north Yukon
  • Column 333: Mining the leaves for green
  • Column 332: Warm winters could mean spring floods
  • Column 331: Dawson fish trap produces unexpected catch
  • Column 330: Four-stroke engines kinder to the environment
  • Column 329: Showy roadside plants peaking
  • Column 328: Yukon’s lightning detective on high alert
  • Column 327: Some lovely lupines also good to eat
  • Column 326: Astronomy, northern style
  • Column 325: More than rocks under our feet
  • Column 324: Wolverines a sure sign of wilderness
  • Column 323: Ancient creeks created modern Yukon oases
  • Column 322: Thresholds and caribou
  • Column 321: Simple sun power
  • Column 320: Greening the fleet
  • Column 319: Yukon bird book finally hits the shelves
  • Column 318: Tracking Southern Lakes caribou
  • Column 317: Pilot as scientist
  • Column 316: Northern communities decide to set an example
  • Column 315: Tracking West Nile
  • Column 314: Divide and conquer
  • Column 313: Tiny fossils tell a tale
  • Column 312: Keeping track of the wild things
  • Column 311: Data in and planning out
  • Column 310: Cycling through the snow
  • Column 309: Shadowing the swans
  • Column 308: Wilderness tourism

2002 columns

  • Column 307: The Annual World Famous yourYukon Christmas Quiz
  • Column 306: Marmots in a changing world
  • Column 305: Young scientists tackle ambitious projects
  • Column 304: Homo ecologicus
  • Column 303: Understanding the boreal forest
  • Column 302: Project sets up library of rare species and plant communities
  • Column 301: Coming to a road near you?
  • Column 300: Salt of the road
  • Column 299: Wood bison not yet out of the woods
  • Column 298: Carnivores keep each other in balance
  • Column 297: Year of the mouse
  • Column 296: Woodchucks chuck Yukon wood
  • Column 295: Bio-engineering on a Yukon culvert
  • Column 294: Lichens are a partnership
  • Column 293: Westward shift not a healthy move for Hart River Caribou
  • Column 292: Solving the mystery of the wandering rocks
  • Column 291: Volunteering for science in Kluane
  • Column 290: Fish bones show the years
  • Column 289: No news is good news
  • Column 288: Researcher brings home wind energy expertise
  • Column 287: Alpine plants watched closely
  • Column 286: Grizzly bears smell their opportunity
  • Column 285: Beringian butterflies
  • Column 284: Collecting data the high-tech way
  • Column 283: Shrews live fast and furiously
  • Column 282: Technology tools aid fire managers
  • Column 281: Flying fish is highway hazard
  • Column 280: Hardy northern plants have valuable secrets
  • Column 279: Going green for health, economics and the environment
  • Column 278: Swallows make the Yukon summer
  • Column 277: Sheep population comes in bursts
  • Column 276: Banding birds is a passion
  • Column 275: Trumpeter swans broadcast their arrival
  • Column 274: Landing the Mid-sized One in a Yukon stocked lake
  • Column 273: The science of composting
  • Column 272: Earth energy explored in the Yukon
  • Column 271: Alberta’s land use lessons and Yukon’s window of opportunity
  • Column 270: Hybrid technology put to the test on Yukon roads
  • Column 269: Rivers out of sight, not out of mind
  • Column 268: New technology smarter, faster, safer
  • Column 267: Yukon spider new to science
  • Column 266: Vulnerability makes this climate change different
  • Column 265: Donjek Glacier reshapes Yukon landscape
  • Column 264: Forty-Mile Basin project will set pattern for future studies
  • Column 263: Neglected feeders can endanger birds
  • Column 262: Carmacks coal just keeps on burning
  • Column 261: Monitoring sediment leads to spin-offs
  • Column 260: Cleaning up the air benefits everyone
  • Column 259: Tracking the weather from below

2001 columns

  • Column 258: The Great Rate-Yourself Your Yukon Christmas Quiz
  • Column 257: Fish in winter
  • Column 256: Flood forecasting is different in the north
  • Column 255: Flooding is a year-round business
  • Column 254: A world underwater
  • Column 253: Caribou counters think small
  • Column 252: Scientists re-measure wind chill
  • Column 251: Klondike famous for really really old permafrost
  • Column 250: Bunnies may help berries grow
  • Column 249: A volcano in the neighbourhood
  • Column 248: Lake trout work to stay cool
  • Column 247: Sturdy muskox thriving
  • Column 246: Migration hazardous for young golden eagles
  • Column 245: Ancient salmon hold clues to cycles
  • Column 244: Interpreting Whitehorse wildlife
  • Column 243: Day one at the salmon hatchery
  • Column 242: The case of the arboricidal megaherbivores
  • Column 241: Clover not always a sweet sight
  • Column 240: Mapping the modern way
  • Column 239: Looking for lichens
  • Column 238: Figuring out the forests of the future
  • Column 237: A Yukon breadbasket?
  • Column 236: Keys are key when identifying plants
  • Column 235: Dragonflies are little gems
  • Column 234: Postponing wildfires a dangerous game
  • Column 233: Lightning starts the big ones
  • Column 232: Subalpine fir more important in the past
  • Column 231: Bird counts do count
  • Column 230: Species at the edge
  • Column 229: Keeping tabs on wild species
  • Column 228: Fannin sheep are standouts
  • Column 227: All caribou herds not created equal
  • Column 226: Porcupine caribou face an uncertain future
  • Column 225: Monitoring the migration
  • Column 224: Biodiversity awarded
  • Column 223: By their calls you shall know them
  • Column 222: Groundwater runs deep
  • Column 221: Beringian weather
  • Column 220: Boingggg… the springtails are hopping!
  • Column 219: Old lead sentences swans to death
  • Column 218: Finding the gaps
  • Column 217: Tracking Whitehorse water
  • Column 216: Vagrants on the wing
  • Column 215: Coyotes like town living
  • Column 214: Putting the focus on caribou
  • Column 213: Ozone thinning over Arctic
  • Column 212: Ice not as nice for some polar bears
  • Column 211: Whitehorse air cleaning up
  • Column 210: Moose moving north
  • Column 209: The long dark sleep of a bear

2000 columns

  • Column 208: Take the Christmas quiz!
  • Column 207: Arctic circle won’t stay put
  • Column 206: Group living works well for hoary marmots
  • Column 205: No clean bill of health for Yukon salmon
  • Column 204: The southeast Yukon’s “wall of song”
  • Column 203: Oil spill science can be slippery
  • Column 202: Contaminants found me
  • Column 201: Whither Yukon bats in winter
  • Column 200: Rare artifacts melt out of ice
  • Column 199: Ice patches a link with the past
  • Column 198: Ancient secrets on ice
  • Column 197: Herschel an island of change
  • Column 196: Farms can be toxic for birds
  • Column 195: Pesticides plague migrating birds
  • Column 194: Pikas cannot beat the heat
  • Column 193: Kluane glaciers in retreat
  • Column 192: Beetles leave their mark in North
  • Column 191: Northern dunes not deserts
  • Column 190: Cleaning up Lake Laberge
  • Column 189: Arsenic pollution hard to track
  • Column 188: Mt. Logan’s frozen secrets
  • Column 187: Pacific salmon heading north
  • Column 186: Mosquitoes not all bad
  • Column 185: It’s getting warm out there
  • Column 184: Parasites like it warm
  • Column 183: Spring the cruelest season?
  • Column 182: Human power gains momentum
  • Column 181: Losing ground up North
  • Column 180: Counting owls not a day job
  • Column 179: Working together on the weather
  • Column 178: The soil that binds
  • Column 177: Burrowing burbots of Lake Laberge
  • Column 176: The Dawson Ice Lottery
  • Column 175: Bird-watching via satellite
  • Column 174: From snowflake to avalanche
  • Column 173: The cost of a calf
  • Column 172: Tracking change in Kluane
  • Column 171: Pop goes the pingo
  • Column 170: Arctic haze a spring affair
  • Column 169: Ancient water holds clue to future
  • Column 168: Northern meteors a big hit
  • Column 167: Kluane grizzlies have good genes
  • Column 166: Solar north of 60
  • Column 165: Wood heat wisdom
  • Column 164: Northern dinosaurs
  • Column 163: Ground squirrels on downswing
  • Column 162: The idling dilemma
  • Column 161: Another solar maximum

1999 columns

  • Column 160: Take the annual Christmas quiz
  • Column 159: Forecast: light show tonight
  • Column 158: Faro’s fabulous Fannins
  • Column 157: A century of bird counts
  • Column 156: Finding the right questions
  • Column 155: Danger: thin ice ahead
  • Column 154: Global warming and fish
  • Column 153: Capturing bats on tape
  • Column 152: Cleaning up the DEW Line
  • Column 151: Little known world of fungi
  • Column 150: Wind takes a toll on trees
  • Column 149: Butterflies an attraction in Keno
  • Column 148: Yukon gets the shakes
  • Column 147: The Chadburn Buried Valley
  • Column 146: Muck hides buried treasure
  • Column 145: Restoring species to the wild
  • Column 144: Making the endangered list
  • Column 143: Cranes true to the trench
  • Column 142: The Yukon’s own salt flats
  • Column 141: Name that fish
  • Column 140: Stressed-out trees
  • Column 139: Mist nets snare birds and data
  • Column 138: Reading the river’s stories
  • Column 137: Be bear aware
  • Column 136: Searching for the source
  • Column 135: The year of no summer
  • Column 134: Exploring the boreal forest
  • Column 133: Summer solstice sizzlers
  • Column 132: Loess is the key
  • Column 131: Exploring northern futures
  • Column 130: Glaciers gallop in cycles
  • Column 129: Southern species head north
  • Column 128: Which way did the river run?
  • Column 127: Change bad for Ice Age mammals
  • Column 126: Tracking the past at older mines
  • Column 125: Swans down on the farm
  • Column 124: A bargain recycled house
  • Column 123: Swan Lake a refuge
  • Column 122: Climate change affects caribou
  • Column 121: Lightening the garbage load
  • Column 120: Ptarmigan protect their own
  • Column 119: Bunnies, bunnies everywhere
  • Column 118: Are the Old Crow Flats drying up?
  • Column 117: Look what the wind is blowing
  • Column 116: Experiential science, Yukon-style
  • Column 115: Mapping a community
  • Column 114: Hot springs source a secret
  • Column 113: Winter ways of salmon
  • Column 112: Yukon weather goes to extremes
  • Column 111: The buzz on Yukon insects

1998 columns

  • Column 110: Santa’s reindeer could have Yukon roots
  • Column 109: Green energy at a good price
  • Column 108: Crossbills an enigma
  • Column 107: Buy nothing for a day
  • Column 106: Satellites track Kluane bears
  • Column 105: Pikas are not picky eaters
  • Column 104: Beringian plants survive
  • Column 103: DNA goes under the microscope
  • Column 102: Loss of peatlands means climate change
  • Column 101: The hanging tree
  • Column 100: Meandering moose are a mystery
  • Column 99: Woodsmoke can be toxic
  • Column 98: Droppings are a storehouse of knowledge
  • Column 97: Prehistoric Yukon hunters left treasures
  • Column 96: The skinny on the Polar Night
  • Column 95: Prehistory in a lake bottom
  • Column 94: Lemmings puzzle scientists
  • Column 93: Selfish caribou love their summer greens
  • Column 92: It’s August and the birds are flying the coop
  • Column 91: Youngsters kicking up a storm
  • Column 90: Ways of salmon remain a mystery
  • Column 89: Movements of muskox are a mystery
  • Column 88: Microhydro generates affordable power
  • Column 87: ITEX plots track changes
  • Column 86: Keeping an eye – and ear – on birds in the nest
  • Column 85: Make your boat environmentally friendly
  • Column 84: Sediment in aquatic environments can be deadly
  • Column 83: Roadside waterfowl survey is important
  • Column 82: Putting the Kyoto protocol to work
  • Column 81: Welcome to the Riparian Zone
  • Column 80: What’s wriggling in the water?
  • Column 79: Lagoon works wonders
  • Column 78: Avian cholera a big killer of waterfowl
  • Column 77: The definition of wilderness is changing
  • Column 76: A mosaic of environments
  • Column 75: Swans making recovery
  • Column 74: Reducing benefits all
  • Column 73: The importance of biodiversity
  • Column 72: Local fish parasites are harmless to humans
  • Column 71: Foresters measure trees the smart way
  • Column 70: Caribou on the web column_070_PDF
  • Column 69: Geographic information systems are hot column_069_PDF
  • Column 68: Remote sensing is a miraculous tool column_068_PDF
  • Column 67: El Niño a fickle friend column_067_PDF
  • Column 66: Drilling holes in icefields column_066_PDF
  • Column 65: Health effects of woodsmoke column_065_PDF
  • Column 64: Air today, gone tomorrow column_064_PDF
  • Column 63: Insect antifreeze column_063_PDF

1997 columns

1996 columns

  • Column 12: Test how green you are (Christmas quiz) column_012_PDF
  • Column 11: The unexplored Yukon column_011_PDF
  • Column 10: All party committee worked (Al Kapty, environmental regulation of placer mining) column_010_PDF
  • Column 9: Fuel spills fairly common (George Balmer, Stephen Arrell) column_009_PDF
  • Column 8: No, crystal balls aren’t used (Michael Purves, weather forecasting) column_008_PDF
  • Column 7: Goldeneye study to help management area (Debbie van de Wetering, Old Crow Flats waterfowl) column_007_PDF
  • Column 6: Snag cleanup tagged at $1M (Mark Palmer, contaminated sites) column_006_PDF
  • Column 5: Spineless species important (Benoit Godin, benthic invertebrates) column_005_PDF
  • Column 4: Grow wheat in Whitehorse? (Scott Smith, climate change and agriculture) column_004_PDF
  • Column 3: La Biche rich with bird life (Pam Sinclair) column_003_PDF
  • Column 2: Pop bottles warm in winter (Dawn Lammer, recycling) column_002_PDF
  • Column 1: Keeping on top of hazardous waste spills (George Balmer, Yukon spill line) column_001_PDF

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